Archive for February, 2013

Figure Drawing 101

Written by Pour Your ART Out peeps on . Posted in ARTpreneurs, Pour Your ART Out, Uncategorized, Youth Apprentices

For the first time at Arts On the Block, we had a Figure Drawing Course–by an great instructor and fellow artist by the name of Julie Philips. Philips gave our apprentices a crash course in figure drawing 101–which we even had a real model for practice–yours truly.

Learning about lighting, shadows, and the basic anatomy of the figure with Julie.

She began teaching the lesson by showing our apprentices some sample works of figure drawings by various portraiture artists. Instructing them on light and shadow, and the anatomy of the figure. With a warm up, she had everyone crumple a piece of white paper, and sketch all the different lights and shadows within the folds and wrinkles of the paper.  Next she led them into the first exercise of the day–drawing the gesture. In which, the apprentices had to draw fleeting poses of the model that would quickly change into the next posture.

 

gesture drawings, Figure Drawing 101 at AoB

gesture drawings, Figure Drawing 101 at AoB

For this exercise she introduced many to new mediums–vine charcoal, compressed charcoal, white conté, and for practice–newsprint paper. After some warm up sketches, they did some longer five and ten minute poses.

 

Following their gestures and short poses–Philips added a final exercise, in which our apprentices had to incorporate everything they learned into a final twenty minute pose. Each apprentice had a unique approach, which was intriguing to watch as they replicated the model on brown toned paper, using white acrylic paint, and compressed charcoal to capture light and shadow.

 

Drawing the figure, after a 20 minute pose session.

Drawing the figure, after a 20 minute pose session.

 

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The apprentices using new mediums, as they recreate the figure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our apprentices truly enjoyed their crash drawing course, and many of them became inspired to practice more with these newfound materials and skill sets. Arts On The Block sends a huge thank you to Julie Philips for visiting our studio and teaching us the creative process of figure drawing!

 

February 27, 2013

-Aprill H.

An Adventure of Imagination!

Written by Pour Your ART Out peeps on . Posted in Excel Beyond the Bell, Projects and Programs, Uncategorized

 

Headed to a behind the scenes tour of the Imagination Stage.

Headed to a behind the scenes tour of the Imagination Stage.

Our students from the Excel Beyond the Bell program went on a very exciting adventure to the Imagination Stage this weekend. Not only were they able to see an incredible play called: Anime Momotaro–but they were given the amazing opportunity to go on a special behind the scenes theatre tour. Anime Momotaro is a Japanese folk tale that tells the story of an elderly couple that desperately yearns for a child to help them complete their daily tasks. To their surprise–their wishes are granted one day as they receive a son from a magical peach, born with super strength and special peach powers. As Momotaro grows, he becomes the strongest in land…but his strengths are soon put to the test when their village is attacked and overrun by pillaging ogres. It is then up to Momotaro to save the land, as he learns that with great powers, come great responsibility.

Excel Beyond The Bell Q&A session with the actors of Anime Momotaro.

Excel Beyond The Bell  Q&A session with the actors of     Anime Momotaro.

One of the many great feats about this production in particular–was the cast only had 5 actors to play all of the different colorful characters in the story. After the play, our students had a wonderful opportunity to have a meet and greet with them. Allowing them the chance to ask them questions about acting, the making of the set, the sound production process, and so much more!

Some of the thoughtful questions asked by the students were the following:

How difficult is it to memorize all the lines?

Where do the sounds come from for certain actions on the stage during the performance?

What goes into building and taking down the colorful set and the scenery on stage? How long does it take to build it and take it down for performances?

540964_10151477647059549_1432610731_n                          The Incredible Wall of Shoes! Behind the scenes of The Imagination Stage!

          Behind the scenes of
         The Imagination Stage:
          Costumes and Set Design!

 

After the Q&A with the actors, the tour continued back stage–as we saw the sound room, where they produce and create all kinds of sounds for the performances and play them during shows. Next, we ventured to see all the costumes and an incredible wall of shoes that actors wear during different acts on stage. Backstage we even witnessed another stage set up in the process of being created. A talented painter was backstage creating props for another upcoming production.

Our behind the scenes tour comes to a close, being on the actual stage.

Our behind the scenes tour comes to a close, being on the actual stage.

Finally, the tour concluded with our students having the incredible opportunity to be on the imagination stage! With the help of our tour guides explaining what went into building the set–how the set is deconstructed after performances, and secret entrances that actors and actresses use to enter and exit during a play.

It was truly an adventure that everyone cherished–and the awesome performance was beyond everyone’s wild imaginations! So a big thank you to the The Imagination Stage, for showing us the wonder, awe, and power of creativity!

February 23, 2013
-Aprill H.

Resume Writing Workshop

Written by Pour Your ART Out peeps on . Posted in Pour Your ART Out, Youth Apprentices

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Catherine Henderson visited our studio today for a PYAO resume-writing workshop. Giving our apprentices valuable insights for entering the working world as future young adults. She offered advice as far as organizing and setting a resume for a job interview, gave them tips as far as how to make a good lasting impression, and asked prep questions that an interviewer might ask during future employment opportunities. Every apprentice left with an improved resume at the end of the workshop, best of all—those who hadn’t had any prior experience with resume writing– left with a well–written resume to build upon.

Below is a personal account from an apprentice who attended the workshop:

“It was really beneficial to have Catherine Henderson come in and teach us about resumes. She reviewed my resume individually, and gave me tips on how to improve it for the future. She also taught us acceptable behavior for job interviews. For example: proper posture, pleasant greetings, and appropriate use of language.”

Yodit K.

As the apprentices learn these new job skills, I am confident they will lead them to bright futures as they move forward into the working world as successful young adults.

-Aprill H.

A Children’s Book Author/Illustrator Shares His Story

Written by Jan on . Posted in Projects and Programs, Uncategorized

Here at Arts on the Block, one of our overarching goals is for our young artists to become “conscious and skilled creators of future opportunities in education, careers, and life.” In our early years, we were surprised to discover  how naive our participants were regarding the plethora of opportunities that are available to them as creative human beings. Ever since, we have tried very diligently in all our programs to introduce our youth to very real educational and career options that they might never have considered.

I recently came across this charming video of children’s book author and illustrator, Jarrett J. Krosoczka, telling the story of his discovery of the career of his dreams. Born to a heroine addict and raised by his grandparents, Jarrett’s path to a successful career was fraught with challenges, including a rejection from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) — the college from which he eventually graduated. Jarrett has ten wildly creative — and published — children’s book titles to his credit. Thank you to TED.com for inviting him to share his story.


Jarrett J. Krosoczka: How a boy became an artist

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